(_To Robert Gould Shaw_) Flushed with the hope of high desire, He buckled on his sword, To dare the rampart ranged with fire, Or where the thunder roared; Into the smoke and flame he went, For God's great cause to die-- A youth of h... Read more of My Hero at Martin Luther King.caInformational Site Network Informational
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THE CITY LUNCHEONS.





(Combination and Group Problems)
Twelve men connected with a large firm in the City of London sit down to
luncheon together every day in the same room. The tables are small ones
that only accommodate two persons at the same time. Can you show how
these twelve men may lunch together on eleven days in pairs, so that no
two of them shall ever sit twice together? We will represent the men by
the first twelve letters of the alphabet, and suppose the first day's
pairing to be as follows--
(A B) (C D) (E F) (G H) (I J) (K L).
Then give any pairing you like for the next day, say--
(A C) (B D) (E G) (F H) (I K) (J L),
and so on, until you have completed your eleven lines, with no pair ever
occurring twice. There are a good many different arrangements possible.
Try to find one of them.


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