THE STAR PUZZLE.





[Illustration:
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Put the point of your pencil on one of the white stars and (without ever
lifting your pencil from the paper) strike out all the stars in fourteen
continuous straight strokes, ending at the second white star. Your
straight strokes may be in any direction you like, only every turning
must be made on a star. There is no objection to striking out any star
more than once.
In this case, where both your starting and ending squares are fixed
inconveniently, you cannot obtain a solution by breaking a Queen's Tour,
or in any other way by queen moves alone. But you are allowed to use
oblique straight lines--such as from the upper white star direct to a
corner star.





THE SQUARES OF BROCADE. THE STONEMASON'S PROBLEM. facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

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